About the Departmental Colloquia

These talks are informal presentations of works-in-progress, usually followed by a substantial discussion period. Interested guests from other departments or institutions are welcome to attend unless otherwise noted. Graduate students and undergraduates are also welcome, although the presentations are not ordinarily prepared with a student audience in mind. Unless otherwise noted, talks are held in the Philosophy Department seminar room, Phillips Hall 510.  Sessions officially break up after one hour, although the room will usually be available for those who wish to continue the discussion. For more information, see our FAQ below. 

Upcoming Presentations

Friday, November 30, 2012 - 12:15 pm
Mark Ralkowski, George Washington University
"Heidegger’s Platonic Critique of Modernity"

Past Presentations

Friday, October 19, 2012 - 12:15 pm
Jason Fisette, George Washington University
"The Moral Analogy of Natural Principles: Berkeley and Hume on Secondary Qualities in a Corpuscular Age"

Friday, October 5, 2012 - 12:15 pm
Eric Saidel, George Washington University
"Through the Looking Glass, and what we (don't) find there"

Friday, September 21, 2012 - 12:15 pm
David DeGrazia, George Washington University
"On The Ethics OF American Handgun Ownership"

Friday, September 14, 2012 - 11:00 am
Richard Reeves, Director of DPM
"Why Liberals Hold the Moral High Ground"

Friday, April 13, 2012 - 12:45pm
Michael Sigrist, George Washington University
"Objections to a Naive Theory of Temporal Perception"

Friday, April 6, 2012 - 12:15pm
David DeGrazia, George Washington University
"What is Suffering and What Sorts of Beings Can Suffer?"

Friday, March 2, 2012 - 12:15pm
Anthony Friend, Canadian Bureau of Statistics
"System of Accounts for Global Entropy Production, (SAGE-P) and the ‘Integration Problem’ of the Natural and Social Sciences"

Friday, January 27, 2012 - 12:15pm
David DeGrazia, George Washington University
"Moral Enhancement, Freedom, and What We Should Value in Moral Behavior"

Friday, December 2, 2011 - 12:15pm
Abdrea Pedeferri, George Washington University

Friday, October 28, 2011 - 12:15pm
Michael Sigrist, George Washington University
"Narrativity, Aspect and Selfhood: Death as the Further Fact of Personal Identity"

Friday, October 7, 2011 - 12:15pm
Peter Caws, George Washington University
"Transforming Human Nature"

Friday, September 23, 2011 - 12:15pm
Jorn Sonderholm, George Washington University
"Cullity, affluence and logic"

Friday, May 13, 2011 - 12:30pm
David DeGrazia, George Washington University
"Bearing Children with Disadvantage"

Friday, April 15, 2011 - 12:30pm
Anjana Jacob, George Washington University
"Multiplicity in Experience and the Nature of Relations"

Friday, April 1, 2011 - 12:30pm
Peter Caws, George Washington University
"The Paradox of the Universe"

Friday, April 8, 2011 - 12:30pm
Jorn Sonderholm, George Washington University
"Positive duties to minimize global poverty: where do they end?"

Friday March 11, 2011 - 12:30pm
Ulrika Björk, Uppsala University/Penn State University
"Crisis, Politics and the Common World: Arendy and Husserl"

Friday, March 4, 2011 - 12:30pm
Kimberly Mutcherson, Rutgers School of Law
"Feel Like Making Babies? Mapping the Borders of the Right to Procreate in a Post-Coital World"

Friday, February 11, 2011 - 12:30pm
Fred Kellogg, George Washington University
"Hobbes, Holmes, and Dewey: Pragmatism and the Problem of Order"

Friday, December 10, 2010 - 12:30pm
Dr. David DeGrazia will present a chapter from his forthcoming book.

Friday, October 22, 2010 - 12:30pm
Dr. Gail Weiss
"Pride and Prejudice: Ambiguous Racial, Religious, and Ethnic Identities of Jewish Bodies"

Friday, October 8, 2010 - 12:30pm
Dr. Tad Zawidzki will present a chapter from his forthcoming book Mindshaping: Linchpin of the Human Socio-Cognitive Syndrome (MIT Press).
"The Role of Sophisticated Mindreading in Human Mindshaping"

Friday, April 30, 2010 - 12:30-2:00 pm [rescheduled]
Matthew Adler (Leon Meltzer Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania) will present a chapter from his forthcoming book Well-Being and Equity: A Framework for Policy Analysis (Oxford, 2011). 
Click to download paper.

Friday, April 23, 2010 - 1:00 pm
Dr. William Griffith "The Justification of Coercive Interrogation"
Click to download abstract.

Friday, April 9, 2010 - 2:00 pm
Dr. Zed Adams, New School for Social Research
"How to argue for color relativism"

Friday, March 5, 2010
Dr. Michèle Friend
"A Pluralist Approach to Proof in Mathematics"

Friday, February 19, 2010
Dr. Jorn Sonderholm, The World Bank
"Base property exemplification in moral supervenience"

Friday, January 29, 2010 - 2:00pm
Dr. Tom Morris
“No, Socrates: How Plato Wants us to Read the Discussion of the Guardians’ Nature and Nurture in the Republic

Friday, November 20, 2009 - 3:30pm
Dr. George Wrisley
“Truth, Nonsense, and the Meaningfulness of Ostensive Gestures”

Friday, November 13, 2009 - 3:30pm
Andrea Pedeferri
"Why do we Call Second Order Logic 'Logic'"?

Friday, November 6, 2009 - 12:30pm
Dr. Lisa Käll, University of Uppsala, Sweden
"Expressive Space: Encountering Self and Other"

Friday, October 30, 2009 - 12:30pm
Dr. Tad Zawidzki
"Theory of Mind, Computational Tractability, and Mind Shaping"

Friday, September 11, 2009 - 12:30pm
Dr. Jeffrey Brand
"Moral Constructivism and Empirical Debunking"

Friday, September 4, 2009 - 2:30pm
Dr. Jorn Sonderholm, The World Bank
"A Bad Argument Against Patient Rights for Life-Saving Medicines"

Department Colloquia FAQ

  • What are the Colloquia?
    Every semester the Department sponsors a series of colloquia, also known as "brown-bag talks." These are informal presentations of works-in-progress, usually followed by a substantial discussion period.
  • Where and when do the Colloquia take place?
    Colloquia are held in the Department seminar room, Phillips Hall 510, on Fridays at 12:15pm during the fall and spring semesters, unless otherwise noted above. Attendees often bring their own lunch.
  • How long do they last?
    Sessions officially break up after one hour, although the room will usually be available for those who wish to continue the discussion. Sessions rarely last more than ninety minutes.
  • Who may attend?
    Interested guests from other departments or institutions are welcome to attend unless otherwise noted. Graduate students and undergraduates are also welcome, although the presentations are not ordinarily prepared with a student audience in mind.
  • Who may give a Colloquium presentation?
    Current and former members of the Department, including part-time and adjunct faculty; faculty from other institutions around the world, in philosophy or other disciplines; doctoral students from other departments, in philosophy or other disciplines. If you would like to present a Colloquium, contact the Colloquium Coordinator, Tatiana Romanovskaya.