Department of Psychology
2125 G St., NW
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: (202) 994-6320
Fax: (202) 994-1602
psych@gwu.edu

Jody M Ganiban

Title — Professor of Clinical/Developmental Psychology

Address — 2125 G Street, NW, Room 304, Washington, D.C., 20052

Office — 2125 G Street Room 304

Phone — 202) 994-7571

E-mail — ganiban@gwu.edu

Current Research

Dr. Ganiban’s initial research focused upon the contributions of parent-child attachment relationships and child temperament to development within groups of children that differed in their genetic, temperamental, or environmental risks for emotional and behavioral problems, such as premature infants, toddlers with Down syndrome, maltreated children, and toddlers with feeding disorders. Since 1999, Dr. Ganiban’s research has incorporated behavioral genetic research techniques to examine further the interplay between environmental factors and personal characteristics in determining children’s and parents’ emotional and physical health. Her current projects include assessments of personality, temperament, and genetic makeup, as well as parenting behaviors and conflict between caregivers. These projects examine the contributions of children’s and parents’ personality on family relationships, and explore the extent to which family relationships influence the expression of genetic- or personality-based risks for maladjustment.

Education

Ph.D. 1993, University of Rochester.

Publications

Ganiban, J.M., Ulbricht, J.A., Saudino, K.J., Reiss, D., & Neiderhiser, J.M. (in press). Understanding child-based effects on parenting: temperament as a moderator of genetic and environmental contributions to parenting. Developmental Psychology.

Ganiban J.M. Ulbricht J.A., Spotts E.L., Lichtenstein P., Reiss D., Hansson K.,  Neiderhiser J.M. (2009). Understanding the role of personality in explaining associations between marital quality and parenting. Journal of Family Psychology, 23(5),646-60.

Ganiban, J.M., Saudino, K.J., Ulbricht, J., Neiderhiser, J.M., & Reiss, D. (2008). Stability and change in temperament across adolescence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 222-236.

Narusyte, J., Neiderhiser, J.M., D’Onofrio, B.M., Reiss, D., Spotts, E.L., Ganiban, J.M., & Lichtenstein, P. (2008). Testing different types of genotype-environment correlation: an extended children-of-twins model. Developmental Psychology, 44(6), 1591-1603.

Walum, H., Westberg, L., Henningsson, S., Neiderhiser, J.M., Reiss, D., Igl, W., Ganiban, J.M., Spotts, E.L., Pedersen, N.L., Eriksson, E., & Lichtenstein, P. (2008). Genetic variation in the vasopressin receptor 1a gene (AVPR1A) associates with pair-bonding behavior in humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 105, 14153-14156.

Neiderhiser, J.M., Lichtenstein, P., Pederson, N., Reiss, D., Spotts, E., Ganiban, J.M. (2007) Father-adolescent relationships and the role of genotype-environment correlation. Journal of Family Psychology, 21, 560-571.