Department of Psychology
2125 G St., NW
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: (202) 994-6320
Fax: (202) 994-1602
psych@gwu.edu

Lisa Bowleg

Lisa Bowleg

Title — Professor of Applied Social Psychology

Address — 2125 G Street, NW, Room 206, Washington DC 20052

Office — 2125 G Street, NW Room 206; 1922 F Street, NW Room 413A

E-mail — lbowleg@gwu.edu

Current Research

Dr. Bowleg’s research focuses on: (1) the effects of individual-level and social-structural factors (e.g., unemployment, incarceration, racial discrimination) and resilience on Black men’s HIV sexual risk and protective behaviors; (2) intersectionality; and (3) experiences of stress and resilience in Black, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.  She is the joint-Principal Investigator (PI) with Dr. Anita Raj, UCSD of a 2012 NIH/NIMH-funded RO1 (1 R01 MH096657 – 01) to evaluate MEN Count, a housing and employment case management HIV prevention intervention for Black heterosexual men. Dr. Bowleg is also the PI of MANHOOD, a 2012 NIH/NIMH-funded R01 (1 R01 HD074451-01) to test a conceptual model of individual and neighborhood-level social-structural stressors and resilience on Black men’s sexual HIV risk and protective behaviors.  REPRESENT, her 2007 NIH/NICHD-funded R01 (1 R01 HD054319-01), examined the effects of masculinity ideologies, sexual scripts and social-structural factors on Black heterosexual men’s sexual risk behaviors.  Dr. Bowleg is a member of the DC Developmental Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) and the Behavioral and Social Consequences of HIV/AIDS Study Section at NIH. She was awarded the 2008 Red Ribbon Award for Research from the Community Advisory Board of the University of Pennsylvania CFAR. 

Education

Ph.D., 1997 The George Washington University

Publications

Bowleg, L., Mingho, M. & Massie, J.S.  (in press).  ““The skill is using your big head over your little head ”: What Black heterosexual men say they know, want, and need to prevent HIV.  Invited manuscript to the Special Issue on African American Men, American Journal of Men’s Health

Bowleg, L., Burkholder, G.J., Noar, S.M., Teti, M. Malebranche, D.J. & Tschann, J.M.  (Accepted for publication).  Sexual scripts and HIV risk and behaviors among Black heterosexual men: Development of the Sexual Scripts Scale (SSS).  Archives of Sexual Behavior.

Bowleg, L., Burkholder, G.J., Massie,J.S., Wahome, R., Teti, M. Malebranche, D.J. & Tschann, J.M. (2013). Racial discrimination, social support, and sexual HIV risk among Black heterosexual men.  AIDS & Behavior, 17(1), 407-418.  doi: 10.1007/s10461-012-0179-0.  PMID: 22437347

Bowleg, L., Teti, M., Malebranche, D.J., & Tschann, J.M.   (2013). “It’s an uphill battle everyday": Intersectionality and the implications of social-structural factors for sexual HIV risk among Black heterosexual men.  Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 14(1), 25-34. doi: 10.1037/a0028392. PMCID: 3591486

Bowleg, L. & Raj, A. (2012).  Shared communities, structural contexts, and HIV risk:  Prioritizing the HIV risk and prevention needs of Black heterosexual men.  American Journal of Public Health, 102(S2), S173-S177. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2011.300342.  PMID: 22401513

Bowleg, L. (2012). “Once you’ve blended the cake, you can’t take the parts back to the main ingredients”:  Exploring how Black gay and bisexual men describe and experience intersectionality.  Sex Roles. Epub ahead of print Apr 4.  doi: 10.1007/s11199-012-0152-4

Bowleg, L. (2012).  The problem with the phrase “women and minorities”:  Intersectionality, an important theoretical framework for public health. American Journal of Public Health, , 102(7), 1267-1273. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.300750.  PMID: 22594719

Hussen, S., Bowleg, L., Sangaramoorthy, T., and Malebranche, D. (2012).  "Parents, peers and pornography: The influence of formative sexual scripts on adult HIV sexual risk behaviour among Black men. Culture, Health & Sexuality, Culture, Health & Sexuality, 14(8), 863-877. doi: 10.1080/13691058.2012.703327.  PMID: 22823577

Reed, E., Santana, M. C., Bowleg, L., Welles, S. L., Horsburgh, C., & Raj, A. (2012). Experiences of racial discrimination and relation to sexual risk for HIV among a sample of urban African American men. Journal of Urban Health. doi: 10.1007/s11524-012-9690-x.  PMID: 22674464

Bowleg, L., Teti, M., Massie, J., Patel, A., Malebranche, D.J. & Tschann, J.M.  (2011). “What does it Take to be a Man? What is a real man?”: Black heterosexual men’s masculinity ideologies and sexual HIV risk. Culture, Health & Sexuality, 13(5), 545-559.  PMID: 21390949

Raj, A. & Bowleg, L. (2012).  Heterosexual risk for HIV among Black men in the United States: A call to action against a neglected crisis in Black communities.  American Journal of Men’s Health, 6(3), 178-181. doi: 10.1177/1557988311416496. PMID: 21831928

Teti, M., Martin, A.E.,Randade, R., Massie, J., Malebranche, D.J.,  Tschann, J.M., & Bowleg, L.  (2012).  “I’m a keep rising. I’m a keep going forward, regardless ”: Exploring Black men’s resilient responses to socio-structural challenges and stressors.  Qualitative Health Research, 22(4), 524-533. doi: 10.1177/1049732311422051. PMID: 21911505

Bowleg, L., Valera, P., Teti, M. & Tschann, J.M. (2010).  Silences, gestures, and words: Nonverbal and verbal communication about HIV risk and condom use in Black/African American heterosexual relationships.  Health Communication, 25(1), 1-11.  PMID: 20390673

Bowleg, L., Neilands, T.B.,  & Choi, K.H. (2008).  Evaluating the validity and reliability of a modified Schedule of Sexist Events: Implications for public health research on women’s HIV risk behaviors.  Women & Health, 47(2), 19-40.

Bowleg, L., Burkholder, G., Teti, M. & Craig, M. L.  (2008).  The complexities of outness: Psychosocial predictors of coming out to others among Black lesbian and bisexual women. Journal of LGBT Health Research, 4(4), 153-166.

Bowleg, L.  (2008).  When Black + Woman + Lesbian? ≠ Black Lesbian Woman: The methodological challenges of qualitative and quantitative intersectionality research.  Sex Roles, 59(5-6), 312-325.

Bowleg, L., Brooks, K., & Ritz, S.F. (2008). “Bringing home more than a paycheck:” An exploratory analysis of Black lesbians’ experiences of stress and coping in the workplace, Journal of Lesbian Studies, 12(1) 69-84.

Bowleg, L. (2004). Love, sex, and masculinity in sociocultural context: HIV concerns and condom use among African American men in heterosexual relationships.  Men & Masculinities, 7(2),166-186.

Bowleg, L., Craig, M., & Burkholder, G.  (2004). Rising and surviving: A conceptual model of active coping among Black lesbians. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 10(3), 229-240.

Bowleg, L., Lucas, K.,J., & Tschann, J.M. (2004). “The ball was always in his court”:  An exploratory analysis of relationship scripts, sexual scripts, and condom use among African American women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 28(1), 70-82.

Bowleg, L., Huang, J., Brooks, K., Black, A., & Burkholder, G.   (2003).  Triple jeopardy and beyond:  Multiple minority stress and resilience among Black lesbians.  Journal of Lesbian Studies, 7(4), 87-108.

Bowleg, L., Belgrave, F.Z., & Reisen, C. (2000).  Gender roles, relationship power strategies & precautionary sexual self-efficacy:  Implications for women’s condom/latex barrier use [Special issue: Gender, power, and women’s relationships: Implications for HIV].  Sex Roles, 42(7/8), 613-635.